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HPCC Systems blog contributors are engineers and data scientists who for years have enabled LexisNexis customers to use big data to fulfill critical missions, gain competitive advantage, or unearth new discoveries. Check this blog regularly for insights into how HPCC Systems technology can put big data to work for your own organization.

Cassandra Walker on 03/09/2020
In today’s world, Data Analytics is an important part of sports. Sports organizations on every level use data analytics to predict and improve player performance, a team’s quality of play, prevent injury, increase revenue, and more. Christopher Connelly, a Sport Scientist at North Carolina State University (NCSU), spoke at Community Day 2019 and HPCC Systems Tech Talk 29 about the university’s Athlete 360 program. 
Cassandra Walker on 01/17/2020
James McMullan, Sr. Software Engineer at LexisNexis Risk Solutions, gave an overview of the Spark-HPCC Plugin & Connector in a breakout session at the 2019 HPCC Systems Community Day. This presentation also included an introduction to Apache Zeppelin, a demonstration of a random forest model created in Spark, and a discussion about the future of the Spark-HPCC Ecosystem.
Cassandra Walker on 12/02/2019
The RELX Group Information Assurance and Data Protection organization (IADP) provides oversight of privacy, security, and compliance practices as part of the company’s comprehensive risk mitigation program. The IADP generally works with Risk Solutions and Legal and Professional business, focusing on PII (personal identifiable information) and SPII (sensitive identifiable information), that are available through LexisNexis online products.
Cassandra Walker on 10/22/2019
This ECL Tip spotlights the Enterprise Control Language (ECL) AGGREGATE built-in function. ECL AGGREGATE has been seen by many in the community as ‘complex,’ and as such, has been underused. However, in using AGGREGATE you can be sure you’re playing to the strengths of HPCC Systems.
Cassandra Walker on 09/23/2019
This ECL Tip spotlights the Enterprise Control Language (ECL) DISTRIBUTE function. The ECL DISTRIBUTE function redistributes data across all nodes in a cluster. Using the DISTRIBUTE function can help prevent “cluster skew”, by distributing data evenly across all nodes. This function can be used on Thor or the ROXIE cluster.
Cassandra Walker on 08/29/2019
Deep learning is a subset of machine learning that is modeled on the basis of the human brain. It essentially teaches computers what comes naturally to humans (learning by examples). In this blog, we discuss how deep learning models using background knowledge were used to achieve sequence learning on traffic and natural language. We also introduce the deep learning tool, TensorLayer.
Cassandra Walker on 08/06/2019
Time series forecasting is an important statistical tool for predicting future events, needs, trends, etc., and can be applied to a variety of data sources. Jeremy Meier and David Noh, recent graduates of Clemson University’s Computer Science program, spoke at HPCC Systems Tech Talk episode 23 about the basic principles and components of time series forecasting using modern machine learning methods. This blog gives insight into their semester-long project, which focused on time series analysis and forecasting using financial datasets. 
Cassandra Walker on 07/17/2019
The ECL IDE is an integrated development environment for ECL programmers to create, edit, and execute Enterprise Control Language (ECL) code within the HPCC Systems platform. The latest 7.0 version includes new features and enhancements, such as a more comprehensive autocomplete, tooltips, and F12 capabilities. 
Cassandra Walker on 07/11/2019
This ECL Tip spotlights the Enterprise Control Language (ECL) TABLE function. The TABLE function is a versatile tool for ETL (extract, transform, load) operations, and was one of the first ECL statements available, well before the family of TRANSFORM functions.
Cassandra Walker on 06/26/2019
Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death among women, with about half a million new cases worldwide in 2018 (WHO, 2018). 90% of cervical cancer deaths occur in low resource settings. This mortality could be reduced through effective prevention, screening, and treatment programs.